34 results for "Giving"

AALL1131: Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients with High-Risk B ALL and Ph-like Sensitive Mutations

This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy works in treating young patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that is likely to come back or spread, and in patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-like tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) sensitive mutations. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) and giving the drugs in different doses and in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.

ACNS0831: Ependymoma and Effects of Maintenance Chemotherapy vs. Observation After Induction Chemoradiation


This randomized phase III trial is studying maintenance chemotherapy to see how well it works compared to observation following induction chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating young patients with newly diagnosed ependymoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells and allow doctors to save the part of the body where the cancer started.

S1619: Atezolizumab, Pemetrexed, Cisplatin, and Surgery +/- RT for Stage I-III Malignant Mesothelioma

This phase I pilot trial studies how well atezolizumab, pemetrexed disodium, cisplatin, and surgery with or without radiation therapy in treating patients with stage I-III pleural malignant mesothelioma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Pemetrexed disodium may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving atezolizumab, pemetrexed disodium, and cisplatin before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving atezolizumab after surgery may kill any remaining tumor cells.

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NRG-GI002: Rectal Cancer and the Effects of Veliparib and Combination Chemotherapy

This randomized phase II trial studies how well veliparib works with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as modified (m)FOLFOX6 regimen, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving veliparib with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells and giving it before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.

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A011502: Node Positive HER2 Negative Breast Cancer and the Effects of Placebo vs. Aspirin as Adjuvant Therapy

This randomized phase III trial studies how well aspirin works in preventing the cancer from coming back (recurrence) in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) breast cancer after chemotherapy, surgery, and/or radiation therapy. Aspirin is a drug that reduces pain, fever, inflammation, and blood clotting. It is also being studied in cancer prevention. Giving aspirin may reduce the rate of cancer recurrence in patients with breast cancer.

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AALL15P1: Azacitidine and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Infants with ALL and KMT2A Gene Rearrangement

This pilot phase II trial studies the side effects of azacitidine and combination chemotherapy in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and KMT2A gene rearrangement. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, prednisolone, daunorubicin hydrochloride, cytarabine, dexamethasone, vincristine sulfate, pegaspargase, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, azacitidine, cyclophosphamide, mercaptopurine, leucovorin calcium, and thioguanine work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug may kill more cancer cells.

S1602: Bladder Cancer and the effects of Intravesical Therapy

This randomized phase III trial studies Tokyo-172 strain bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) solution with or without a vaccination using Tokyo-172 strain BCG to see how well it works compared with TICE BCG solution in treating patients with bladder cancer that has not spread to muscle. BCG is a non-infectious bacteria that when instilled into the bladder may stimulate the immune system to fight bladder cancer. Giving different versions of BCG with vaccine therapy may prevent bladder cancer from returning.

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RTOG-1112: Hepatocellular Carcinoma and the Effects of Sorafenib vs SBRT + Sorafenib

This randomized phase III trial studies sorafenib tosylate and stereotactic body radiation therapy to see how well they work compared to sorafenib tosylate alone in treating patients with liver cancer. Sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Stereotactic body radiation therapy may be able to send the radiation dose directly to the tumor and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving sorafenib tosylate together with stereotactic body radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.

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AALL1631: Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome + ALL

This randomized phase III trial studies how well imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

EA5152: Nivolumab, Cabozantinib S-Malate, & Ipilimumab for Recurrent Stage IV NSCLC

This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well nivolumab, cabozantinib s-malate, and ipilimumab work in treating patients with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer that has come back. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Cabozantinib s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving nivolumab, cabozantinib s-malate, and ipilimumab may work better in treating patient with stage IV non-small cell lung cancer.

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Recurrent Osteosarcoma and the effects of Dinutuximab with Sargramostim

This phase II trial studies how well dinutuximab works when given with sargramostim in treating patients with osteosarcoma that has come back after treatment (recurrent). Dinutuximab is a type of drug called a monoclonal antibody. It is designed to recognize a specific target on the surface of cancer cells. It then attaches to the cancer cells and kills them, without harming normal cells. Sargramostim may help the body increase the amount of white blood cells it produces, which help the body fight off infections. Giving sargramostim with dinutuximab may help the dinutuximab work better and kill more cancer cells.

AREN1721: Axitinib and Nivolumab in Treating Unresectable or Metastatic TFE/Translocation Renal Cell Carcinoma

This phase II trial studies how well axitinib and nivolumab works in treating participants with TFE/translocation renal cell carcinoma that cannot be removed by surgery or has spread to other places in the body. Axitinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving axitinib and nivolumab may work better in treating participants with TFE/translocation renal cell carcinoma.

AALL1231: Chemotherapy +/- Bortezomib in Treating Younger Patients with T-Cell ALL or T-Cell Lymphoma

This randomized phase III trial compares how well combination chemotherapy works when given with or without bortezomib in treating patients with newly diagnosed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or stage II-IV T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. Bortezomib may help reduce the number of leukemia or lymphoma cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It may also help chemotherapy work better by making cancer cells more sensitive to the drugs. It is not yet known if giving standard chemotherapy with or without bortezomib is more effective in treating T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma.

S1207: Hormone-Positive Breast Cancer and the Effects of Everolimus with Endocrine Therapy

Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Hormone therapy using tamoxifen citrate, goserelin acetate, leuprolide acetate, anastrozole, letrozole, or exemestane, may fight breast cancer by lowering the amount of estrogen the body makes. Everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet know whether hormone therapy is more effective when given with or without everolimus in treating breast cancer.

This randomized phase III trial studies how well giving hormone therapy together with or without everolimus work in treating patients with breast cancer.

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Hypofractionated Radiation or Conventional Radiation after Surgery for Prostate Cancer

This randomized phase III trial studies how well hypofractionated radiation therapy works compared to conventional radiation therapy after surgery in treating patients with prostate cancer. Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Conventional radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays, gamma rays, neutrons, protons, or other sources to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. It is not yet known whether giving hypofractionated radiation therapy or conventional radiation therapy after surgery may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.

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A041501: Inotuzumab Ozogamicin & Frontline Chemotherapy in Treating Young Adults with Newly Diagnosed B-Cell ALL

This partially randomized phase III trial studies the side effects of Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and how well it works when given with frontline chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies, such as Inotuzumab Ozogamicin, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving Inotuzumab Ozogamicin with chemotherapy may work better in treating young adults with B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

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A091605: Pembrolizumab +/- Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Advanced Merkel Cell Cancer

This randomized phase II trial studies how well Pembrolizumab with or without stereotactic body radiation therapy works in treating patients with Merkel Cell Cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as Pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a specialized radiation therapy that sends X-Rays directly to the tumor using smaller doses over several days and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving Pembrolizumab with stereotactic body radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with Merkel Cell Cancer.

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Cisplatin/Carboplatin & Etoposide +/- Nivolumab in Patients with Extensive Stage Lung Cancer

This randomized phase II clinical trial studies how well cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide work when given together with nivolumab in treating patients with extensive stage lung cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide together with nivolumab may work better in treating patients with extensive stage lung cancer.

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EA8143: Renal Cell Carcinoma and the Effects of Perioperative Nivolumab vs. Observation in Patients

This randomized phase III trial compares nephrectomy (surgery to remove a kidney or part of a kidney) with or without nivolumab in treating patients with kidney cancer that is limited to a certain part of the body (localized). Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nivolumab before nephrectomy may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed, and after nephrectomy to increase survival. It is not yet known whether nivolumab and nephrectomy is more effective than nephrectomy alone in treating patients with kidney cancer.

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NRG-GI004: Combination Chemotherapy, Bevacizumab, and/or Atezolizumab for dMMR Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and/or atezolizumab work in treating patients with deficient DNA mismatch repair colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin calcium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab and atezolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and atezolizumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

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RU011501I: Breast Cancer and of Effects Folate Receptor Alpha Peptide Vaccine, Sargramostim, & Cyclophosphamide

This randomized phase II trial studies how well multi-epitope folate receptor alpha peptide vaccine, sargramostim, and cyclophosphamide work in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer. Vaccines made from a person's white blood cells mixed with tumor proteins may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving multi-epitope folate receptor alpha peptide vaccine, sargramostim, and cyclophosphamide may work better in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer.

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A021502: Colon Cancer and the Effects of Standard Chemotherapy +/- Atezolizumab as Adjuvant Therapy

This randomized phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy and atezolizumab to see how well it works compared with combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with stage III colon cancer and deficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair. Drugs used in combination chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy with atezolizumab may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with colon cancer.

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Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia and the effects of Lintuzumab-Ac225 with Cytarabine

The study is a multicenter, open label Phase I/II trial. The goal of the Phase I part of this study is to find the highest tolerable dose of Lintuzumab-Ac225 that can be given with cytarabine to patients with AML. The goal of the Phase II part of this study is to learn if Lintuzumab-Ac225 and cytarabine can control AML. The safety of this drug combination will also be studied. Lintuzumab-Ac225 is designed to deliver radiation therapy directly inside leukemia cells without giving any radiation to the surrounding normal cells. Cytarabine is designed to insert itself into DNA (genetic material) of cancer cells and stop the DNA from repairing itself.

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GOG-0279: Cisplatin + Gemcitabine & Radiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Vulva

This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy works when given with gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin work in treating patients with squamous cell cancer of the vulva that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving radiation therapy together with gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin may kill more tumor cells.

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EA9161: Ibrutinib and Obinutuzumab with or without Venetoclax in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

This phase III trial studies how well Ibrutinib and Obinutuzumab with or without Venetoclax work in treating patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as Obinutuzumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as Venetoclax, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving Ibrutinib, Obinutuzumab and Venetoclax may work better in treating patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

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AAML1331: Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia and the Effects of Arsenic Trioxide and All-trans Retinoic Acid

This phase III trial studies tretinoin and arsenic trioxide in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia. Standard treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia involves high doses of a common class of chemotherapy drugs called anthracyclines, which are known to cause long-term side effects, especially to the heart. Tretinoin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Arsenic trioxide may stop the growth of cancer cells by either killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Completely removing or reducing the amount of anthracycline chemotherapy and giving tretinoin together with arsenic trioxide may be an effective treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia and may reduce some of the long-term side effects.

S1613: Trastuzumab + Pertuzumab or Cetuximab + Irinotecan for HER2/Neu Amplified Colorectal Cancer

This randomized phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab and pertuzumab work compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with HER2/neu amplified colorectal cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

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NRG-GY007: Ruxolitinib, Paclitaxel, & Carboplatin for Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

This phase I/II partially randomized trial studies the side effects and the best dose of Ruxolitinib Phosphate when given together with Paclitaxel and Carboplatin and to see how well they work in treating patients with Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer. Ruxolitinib Phosphate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as Paclitaxel and Carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving Ruxolitinib Phosphate together with Paclitaxel and Carboplatin may be a better treatment for Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer.

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NRG-GU002: Prostate Cancer and the Effects of Anti-Androgen Therapy and Radiation Therapy +/- Docetaxel

This randomized phase II / III trial studies docetaxel, antiandrogen therapy, and radiation therapy to see how well it works compared with antiandrogen therapy and radiation therapy alone in treating patients with prostate cancer that has been removed by surgery. Androgen can cause the growth of prostate cells. Antihormone therapy may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving antiandrogen therapy and radiation therapy with or without docetaxel after surgery may kill any remaining tumor cells.

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S1612: Azacitidine +/- Nivolumab or Midostaurin, or Decitabine and Cytarabine Alone for AML or MDS

This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well azacitidine with or without nivolumab or midostaurin, or decitabine and cytarabine alone work in treating older patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, decitabine, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Midostaurin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving azacitidine with or without nivolumab or midostaurin, or decitabine and cytarabine alone may kill more cancer cells.

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A171601: Palbociclib and Letrozole or Fulvestrant for ER Positive, HER2 Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well Palbociclib and Letrozole or Fulvestrant works in treating patients aged 70 years and older with estrogen receptor positive, HER2 negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as Letrozole or Fulvestrant, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving Palbociclib and Letrozole or Fulvestrant may work better in treating patients with breast cancer. The trial will explore factors other than chronologic age that can affect toxicity rates as identified using a cancer-specific geriatric assessment.

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NRG-GY005: Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cancer and the Effects of Cediranib + / - Olaparib

This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well cediranib maleate and olaparib work when given together or separately, and compares them to standard chemotherapy in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has returned after receiving chemotherapy with drugs that contain platinum (platinum-resistant) or continued to grow while being treated with platinum-based chemotherapy drugs (platinum-refractory). Cediranib maleate and olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving cediranib maleate and olaparib together may cause more damage to cancer cells when compared to either drug alone or standard chemotherapy.

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ACNS1422: Reduced Craniospinal RT and Chemotherapy for Newly Diagnosed WNT-Driven Medulloblastoma

This phase II trial studies how well reduced doses of radiation therapy to the brain and spine (craniospinal) and chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed type of brain tumor called WNT)/Wingless (WNT)-driven medulloblastoma. Recent studies using chemotherapy and radiation therapy have been shown to be effective in treating patients with WNT-driven medulloblastoma. However, there is a concern about the late side effects of treatment, such as learning difficulties, lower amounts of hormones, or other problems in performing daily activities. Radiotherapy uses high-energy radiation from x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide and lomustine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving reduced craniospinal radiation therapy and chemotherapy may kill tumor cells and may also reduce the late side effects of treatment.

S1608: Follicular Lymphoma and effects of Obinutuzumab +/- PI3K-delta Inhibitor TGR-1202, Lenalidomide, or Combination Chemotherapy

This randomized phase II trial studies how well obinutuzumab with or without PI3K-delta inhibitor TGR-1202, lenalidomide, or combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with grade I-IIIa follicular lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as obinutuzumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. PI3K-delta inhibitor TGR-1202 may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Biological therapies, such as lenalidomide, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving obinutuzumab with or without PI3K-delta inhibitor TGR-1202, lenalidomide, or combination chemotherapy will work better in treating patients with grade I-IIIa follicular lymphoma.

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